parteira:

excuse me i need your leg

parteira:

excuse me i need your leg

(Source: best-of-imgur)

brazilwonders:

Uirapuru-verdadeiro (Cyphorhinus aradus)

brazilwonders:

Uirapuru-verdadeiro (Cyphorhinus aradus)

shopgirl48:

somewhatvintage:

(via Pinterest)

Adore
allcreatures:

Picture: RobertFuller/BNPS (via Pictures of the day: 18 September 2014 - Telegraph)
funnywildlife:

Tiger motherly love by vadaka1986 on Flickr.

(Source: fucktheq)

(Source: olympo)

funnywildlife:

Polar Bear Sleeping in Alaska’s Arctic by Patrick J Endres.
theraptorcage:

Lanner Falcon  (Falco biarmicus)

theraptorcage:

Lanner Falcon  (Falco biarmicus)

rhamphotheca:

Whooping Crane Conservation News:
Four endangered whooping crane chicks raised in captivity began their integration into the wild Saturday as part of the continuing effort to increase the wild population of this species. The cranes, hatched and raised by their parents at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, were released on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin. At one point in the past, researchers believe the Whooping crane population dropped to fewer than two-dozen birds. Today the population is estimated to be approximately 425 in the wild, with another 125 in captivity. If you’d like to read more about the chicks’ release, follow this link: 
Whooping Crane ReleasePhoto by: Kara Zwickey, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
(via: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS))

rhamphotheca:

Whooping Crane Conservation News:

Four endangered whooping crane chicks raised in captivity began their integration into the wild Saturday as part of the continuing effort to increase the wild population of this species.

The cranes, hatched and raised by their parents at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, were released on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin.

At one point in the past, researchers believe the Whooping crane population dropped to fewer than two-dozen birds. Today the population is estimated to be approximately 425 in the wild, with another 125 in captivity.

If you’d like to read more about the chicks’ release, follow this link:

Whooping Crane Release

Photo by: Kara Zwickey, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

(via: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS))

libutron:

Thick-billed Raven - Corvus crassirostris

The Thick-billed Raven, Corvus crassirostris (Corvidae) is a very large and distinctive looking African Crow. Along with the Common ravens, they have the distinction of being the largest of the Passeriformes, measuring 60 - 64 cm in length.

The two more distinctive features of this species are the white patch on the nape and neck, and its large, thickened, deeply curved and white-tipped bill, which has deep nasal grooves.

This beautiful crow can be found in the so called Horn of Africa, in Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan and Ethiopia.

References: [1]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Nicola Destefano | Locality: Ethiopia, 2011] - [Bottom: ©Andrew Luyten | Locality: Semen Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia, 2010]

whiny-sugar-glider:

BBC Natural World

ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:

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jaws-and-claws:

Black Rhino 5208 by mgroberts